Slow burner…

Impressive: main lighthouse on the island built by Robert Stevenson in 1816

Impressive: main lighthouse on the island built by Robert Stevenson in 1816

Quiet as a mouse: looking north across the island

Quiet as a mouse: looking north across the island

Looking east towards Scotlands first ever lighthouse

Looking east towards Scotlands first ever lighthouse

Looking south towards the main buildings and South Horn

Looking south towards the main buildings and South Horn

'Fluke Street' buildings home for the summer months

‘Fluke Street’ buildings home for the summer months

Thursday 26th February comments: The season is slowly bubbling into life as the lighter nights are gradually creeping in and the Isle of May is stirring. It won’t be long before myself and the team are back on the island readying ourselves for another seabird season.

The ‘May’ is not inhabited all year round although it has had some very varied and chequered human history from its early Christianity links (St.Adrian was martyred on the island in 669) to the lighthouse keepers of the modern age. Scotland’s first ever lighthouse was constructed on the island in 1636 (the remains are still evident) although today all the lighthouses which serve the island are automatic.

Nowadays the islands ‘temporary residence’ include myself and my team along with the island researchers and bird observatory visitors. However you can visit the May for the day as daily visitor boats bring out people for three hours at a time and it is well worth a visit! For more information:

Anstruther Pleasure Cruises (boat May Princess from Anstruther): http://www.isleofmayferry.com

12-seater Osprey Rib (from Anstruther): http://www.isleofmayboattrips.co.uk/boat.html

12-seater  Rib (from North Berwick): http://www.seabird.org/boats/isle-of-may-landings/14/160

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.