Honey Delight

Its a distant shot but its a juvenile Honey Buzzard, only 7th record for the Isle of May (David Kinchin-smith)

Its a distant shot but its a juvenile Honey Buzzard, only 7th record for the Isle of May (David Kinchin-smith)

A Siberian rarity; Yellow-browed Warbler feeding on the path! (David Kinchin-smith)

A Siberian rarity; Yellow-browed Warbler feeding on the path! (David Kinchin-smith)

A lot of common migrants on the move today including 20+ Wheatear (David Kinchin-smith)

A lot of common migrants on the move today including 20+ Wheatear (David Kinchin-smith)

Active bird ringing on the island produced a Common Snipe (David Kinchin-smith)

Active bird ringing on the island produced a Common Snipe (David Kinchin-smith)

Saturday 12th September comments: On the face of it, today has been grim. Driving south-easterly winds (peaking at gale force on occasions) with rain for most of the day. With heavy seas it was no surprise that boats did not sail so not exactly the best day on the Isle of May.

Disappointed? Not a chance! The weather is ideal for bringing in common migrant birds and a good scattering were discovered with a few rarities amongst them. A Yellow-browed Warbler was discovered (all the way from Siberia) whilst other unusual birds included a Wryneck and Common Rosefinch amongst good numbers of Wheatears, warblers and thrushes (both Fieldfare and Redwing were recorded).

However the star bird of day came in the form of a dark phase juvenile Honey Buzzard which pitched up onto the west cliffs, only the islands seventh record. The bird did not linger for long as it powered west and eventually south towards the Lothian coastline. The Isle of May continues to surprise and with the weather easing tomorrow (and hopefully boats sailing) we should have a few more bits to talk about.

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